Giralda, part of the Cathedral, Seville, Spain, EUR, 1890, n/a

$ 39.00

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Framing Information

Giralda, part of the Cathedral, Seville, Spain, EUR
n/a, architect(s). From the American Architect and Building News, December 20, 1890. 8.75 by 12.75 inches. VG condition with browning around the edges, some foxing, and light crinkling.
Gelatine Print. This is an original gelatine on fiber based paper. The Giralda (Spanish: La Giralda) is a former minaret that was converted to a bell tower for the Cathedral of Seville in Seville. The tower was begun under the architect Ahmad Ben Baso in 1184. After Ben Baso's death, other architects continued work on the tower. The mathematician and astronomer Jabir ibn Aflah (or Geber) is also often credited with the tower's design. The tower was completed March 10, 1198 with the installation of copper spheres on the tower's top. This picture is extremely hard to find. The American Architect and Building News had a very small circulation during this time and these original gelatines only appeared in a very limited number of issues. It measures 8.75 by 12.75 inches. Has a mat border and foam core backing (not attached to the picture). The whole picture measures approximately 10.75 by 15.75 inches (with border). Extraordinary detail in this early photographic print. Shrink wrapped.

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